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2 Stroke Engines work upside down | 4 Stroke Engines cannot. This is why!
11:41
TheRepairSpecialist

2 Stroke Engines work upside down | 4 Stroke Engines cannot. This is why!

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED Have you ever wondered why a two stroke engine can work up side down, and a conventional four Stoke engine cannot? Well, its all in their design of course, and this video will help make this a little more clear. Generally, both the two stroke carburetor as well as the engine, is structured very much different. The two stroke usually uses a vacuum type mechanism, where as the conventional four stroke carburettor has a float bowl structure where the neat gasoline fuel will contained ready to be used by the main jet. Take a look at this video for more on this! For some FREE Printable Download help Leaflets: https://www.therepairspecialistonline.com/ These downloads are from my very own website and are absolutely Free. They consist of just a few help topics so far but I am continually making more of these Free Downloads. The best of them is that they are printable so you can take them into the workshop with you and study them at you own pace. Many thanks indeed Craig (https://www.therepairspecialistonline.com/) Please check out my amazon shop. I have recommended some useful items from Amazon below. I guarantee you that these items are the sorts of things I use on a daily basis so I know they are good. I have to be careful in recommending products because I have my name and credibility at stake. So I will only recommend good products. https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/therepairspecialist #TwoStrokeEngine #FourStrokeEngine #EngineDesign #CarburetorTechnology #EngineDifferences #EngineOperation #MechanicalDesign #EngineeringExplained #InternalCombustion #EngineTechnology #VacuumCarburetor #FloatBowlCarburetor #EngineComponents #EngineStructure #AutomotiveDesign #EngineMechanics #TwoStrokeCarburetor #FourStrokeCarburettor #EngineFundamentals #MechanicalInsights
How to Buy Correct Chainsaw Chain Replacement (Chain/Bar Numbers Explained) Chain Sizes
08:11
TheRepairSpecialist

How to Buy Correct Chainsaw Chain Replacement (Chain/Bar Numbers Explained) Chain Sizes

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED For some FREE Printable Download help Leaflets: https://www.therepairspecialistonline.com/ Choosing the right chainsaw chain replacement is crucial for optimal performance and safety. It involves understanding chain and bar numbers and selecting the appropriate chain size. In this guide, we'll demystify the process, helping you make an informed choice. 1. Understanding Chain Numbers: Chainsaw chains come with a series of numbers that indicate their specifications. The most common format is "Pitch-Gauge-Drive Links" (e.g., 3/8"-0.050"-72). Pitch: The distance between three consecutive rivets divided by two. It's a crucial measurement that must match the sprocket's pitch on the chainsaw. Gauge: The thickness of the drive links, which fits into the guide bar groove. The gauge must match the groove width on the bar. Drive Links: The number of individual links that engage with the chainsaw's drive sprocket. 2. Chain Pitch: Chain pitch determines the size and spacing of the chain's drive links. Common chain pitches include 3/8", 0.325", and 1/4". Ensure the chain pitch matches the sprocket on your chainsaw. Smaller chainsaws often use 1/4" or 0.325" pitch chains, while larger saws use 3/8" pitch chains. 3. Chain Gauge: Chain gauge refers to the thickness of the drive links. Common gauges include 0.043", 0.050", and 0.063". Ensure the gauge matches the groove width on your guide bar. Larger chainsaws typically require thicker gauge chains for added durability. 4. Chain Length (Drive Links): The number of drive links in the chain affects the fit and tension on the bar. Accurately count the drive links on your old chain or check the chainsaw's manual for the recommended drive link count. 5. Matching Bar and Chain: Ensure the replacement chain matches the length of your guide bar. A chain that is too short or too long can lead to safety hazards and inefficient cutting. 6. Additional Considerations: Choose the type of chain that suits your cutting needs (e.g., full-chisel, semi-chisel, low-profile). Check if your chainsaw requires a safety chain for certain applications. Consider the chain's quality and durability, as high-quality chains tend to last longer. 7. Consult the Manual: Always refer to your chainsaw's manual for specific chain replacement recommendations. It may provide guidance on suitable chain types, sizes, and maintenance. Conclusion: Buying the correct chainsaw chain replacement involves understanding chain and bar numbers, chain pitch, gauge, drive links, and ensuring a proper fit with your chainsaw's guide bar. Taking these factors into account will help you choose the right chain for safe and efficient cutting operations while extending the life of your chainsaw. TIMESTAMP: 00:46 - Why Chainsaw Bar Length may not be correct to quote to suppliers 01:02 - Why two Chainsaw Bars of the same length can need different sized Chains 02:18 - What information Chainsaw Chain suppliers need and where to find it. 02:46 - Pitch Sizes found on Chainsaw Bars 03:17 - What is the Pitch Size? Pitch Size Explained! 03:56 - Gauge Sizes found on Chainsaw Bars | Gauge Sizes Explained! 05:23 - Drive Links, What are they exactly? 06:44 - The 3 important pieces of information when ordering a Chainsaw Chain Have you ever needed a new chainsaw chain, called a supplier, and realised there is far more to ordering a new chain than just quoting your chainsaw's Make, Model and Bar length? This is most probably not because you chose a bad supplier, it's because there is sometimes a specific set of numbers you need to quote to them before they are sure they are supplying you with the correct chain. In this video I show you the which numbers are correct, and where to find them on your chainsaw. Many Thanks Indeed Craig (Website: https://www.therepairspecialistonline.com/) Owner and creator of The Repair Specialist Channel and it's copyrighted content. Please check out my amazon shop. I have recommended some useful items from Amazon below. I guarantee you that these items are the sorts of things I use on a daily basis so I know they are good. I have to be careful in recommending products because I have my name and credibility at stake. So I will only recommend good products. https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/therepairspecialist #ChainsawMaintenance #ChainsawChain #ChainsawTips #ChainsawRepair #ChainsawSafety #ChainsawGuide #ChainsawBar #ChainsawPitch #ChainsawGauge #ChainsawParts #ChainsawUpgrade #OutdoorEquipment #DIYChainsaw #ChainsawCare #ChainsawUsage #ChainsawSafetyTips #LumberjackSkills #ChainsawMaintenanceTips #ChainsawKnowledge #ProperChainsawUse
Mixed up Screws! for Carburetor Fuel Air Adjustment | (on Chainsaw, Weed Wacker etc)
03:03
TheRepairSpecialist

Mixed up Screws! for Carburetor Fuel Air Adjustment | (on Chainsaw, Weed Wacker etc)

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED Mixing up the high and low screws on a chainsaw carburetor can lead to difficulties in achieving the correct fuel-air mixture and, consequently, hinder the engine's performance. Here are some tips on what to do if you've inadvertently swapped the high and low screws during carburetor servicing: Identify the High and Low Screws: Firstly, try to identify which screw is the high-speed screw and which is the low-speed screw. In most chainsaw carburetors, the high-speed screw is usually marked "H" or "HI," while the low-speed screw is marked "L" or "LO." If there are no markings, check the carburetor manual or manufacturer's specifications. Consult the Manual: If you have the chainsaw's manual or the carburetor manual, refer to it. It often provides clear instructions on identifying and adjusting the high and low screws. If you don't have the manual, you might find it online on the manufacturer's website. Trial and Error: If you're unable to determine which screw is which, you may need to experiment. Start with one screw and make minor adjustments while monitoring the chainsaw's performance. Pay attention to how it idles and revs. The screw that affects the idle is likely the low-speed screw, while the one impacting the high-speed operation is the high-speed screw. Tune One at a Time: Once you have identified the screws correctly, focus on adjusting one at a time. Start with the low-speed screw, which affects the chainsaw's idle and low-end performance. Adjust it until the engine idles smoothly and accelerates without hesitation. Proceed with the High-Speed Screw: After successfully setting the low-speed screw, move on to the high-speed screw. Adjust it to achieve the desired high-end performance, ensuring that the engine runs smoothly at full throttle without sputtering or overheating. Monitor and Fine-Tune: After adjusting both screws, run the chainsaw and observe its performance. Fine-tune the screws as needed to achieve optimal acceleration and smooth operation across the entire RPM range. Listen to the Engine: A well-tuned chainsaw engine has a distinctive sound. If the mixture is too lean (often caused by incorrect high-speed screw adjustment), the engine may emit a high-pitched or squealing sound. If it's too rich (usually due to the low-speed screw), you might hear a deep, bogged-down noise. Listen to the engine to gauge its performance. Consult a Professional: If you find it challenging to identify the screws, or if you can't achieve the desired performance, it's a good idea to consult a professional chainsaw technician. They can quickly identify the high and low screws and fine-tune the carburetor for optimal performance. Remember that the proper adjustment of the high and low screws is essential for both engine performance and safety. Incorrectly adjusted carburetor screws can lead to poor engine performance, overheating, or even damage. Take your time, and with patience and careful observation, you can get your chainsaw back to running in top shape. This principle works for most types of Chainsaw saws, and the following also helps with Chainsaw maintenance. So, whether you are using a Stihl Chainsaw, Husquvarna Chainsaw, basically, all types of Petrol Chainsaw are valid for this principle, as well as many types of or a 2 Stroke Engine. The Electric Chainsaw, of course, escapes this whole principle! TIMESTAMP: 00:14 - I have mixed up my Two Stroke Carburetor Gas Fuel Screws | What do I do? 00:18 - Checking the Gas Fuel Screw hole on the 2-Stroke Carburetor 00:27 - Matching the Fuel Gas Screws to their correct hole | 2-Stroke Carburetor 00:47 - Some Gas Fuel Screws are very similar to each other | Two Stroke Carburetor 00:57 - Comparing each Gas Fuel Adjuster Screw for their correct Fuel Hole 01:24 - What to look for in the Carburetor Adjuster Screw Holes 02:39 - What to do if the Fuel Adjuster Screws are exactly the same, which Fuel Hole? Many thanks indeed Craig Kirkman (Owner and creator of The Repair Specialist channel) Please check out my amazon shop. I have recommended some useful items from Amazon below. I guarantee you that these items are the sorts of things I use on a daily basis so I know they are good. I have to be careful in recommending products because I have my name and credibility at stake. So I will only recommend good products. https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/therepairspecialist #CarburetorMaintenance #FuelAdjusterScrews #TwoStrokeEngine #CarburetorRepairs #CarburetorScrewMatching #EngineTuning #ChainsawMaintenance #SmallEngineRepair #DIYCarburetorWork #CarburetorTips #MechanicSkills #FuelScrewIdentification #CarburetorAdjustment #EngineServicing #MaintenanceAdvice #FuelScrewMatching #TwoStrokeCarb #EngineDiagnosis #TheRepairSpecialistOnline #CarburetorFix
Chainsaw - Essential Maintenance - Great Cutting Season after Season - Here's how!
01:43
TheRepairSpecialist

Chainsaw - Essential Maintenance - Great Cutting Season after Season - Here's how!

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED Proper chainsaw maintenance is essential for keeping your tool in good running condition throughout the season. Here are some essential maintenance tasks to ensure your chainsaw operates smoothly and safely: Regular Cleaning: After every use, clean your chainsaw by removing debris, sawdust, and oil residue. Pay special attention to the air filter, chain brake, and cooling fins. Chain Sharpening: A sharp chain is crucial for efficient cutting and safe operation. Regularly inspect the chain's sharpness and file or sharpen it when needed. Chain Tension: Check and adjust the chain tension to ensure it's snug against the guide bar but can still rotate freely. Too tight or too loose chains can damage your chainsaw or pose a safety risk. Lubrication: Keep the chain and guide bar well-lubricated. Always use the recommended bar and chain oil. Check the oil reservoir and adjust the flow to prevent dry running. Fuel Mixture: If you have a 2-stroke chainsaw, ensure you're using the right fuel-oil mixture. A properly mixed ratio is crucial for the engine's longevity and performance. Fuel Quality: Use fresh, high-quality gasoline. Avoid using old, stale fuel as it can cause starting problems and damage your engine. Air Filter: Regularly clean and inspect the air filter. Replace it when it becomes clogged or damaged. A clean air filter ensures proper air intake and prevents engine damage. Spark Plug: Inspect the spark plug for wear or fouling. Replace it if necessary, and set the gap to the manufacturer's specifications. Cylinder Fins: Keep the cylinder cooling fins free from debris and dirt. Overheating can lead to engine damage. Throttle and Choke: