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Engine Oil Explained Videos: Text
Engine Oil Viscosity Explained | How Heat changes Multi grade oil to 'Act' as Increase in Viscosity
04:57
TheRepairSpecialist

Engine Oil Viscosity Explained | How Heat changes Multi grade oil to 'Act' as Increase in Viscosity

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED This video answers why, and how, a multi-grade oil can switch its viscosity from thin when cold, to thicker when hot. This seems odd! A simple, easy explanation of what engine oil codes mean, giving a sound understanding. For some FREE Printable Download help Leaflets: https://www.therepairspecialistonline.com/ TIMESTAMP: 00:32 - What do oil codes mean? 'Explained' 00:36 - What does 5W-30 mean? 'Explained' 00:37 - What is Engine oil viscosity? 'Explained' 00:44 - What does the engine oil 'W' mean? 00:48 - What does 5W mean? 00:54 - What does '30' mean on 5W-30 engine oil? 01:00 - How engine oil has two viscosity's 01:04 - Viscosity of hot 5W-30 engine oil 01:21 - How multi-grade engine oil behaves in the heat at working temperature 01:58 - How SAE30 oil can damage a car engine but not a lawnmower 02:13 - How a SAE30 engine oil behaves in the heat at working temperature 03:22 - How a multi grade engine oil works (viscosity explained) 04:44 - A personal thank you from Craig Kirkman Finally, I also recommend you see this particular video where I explain the molecular changes that occur, due to additives and heat, within the engine oil, that make it change from a one viscosity type to another as the engine is used: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRvZy... My aim is to create more videos on mineral oil, motor oil, best engine oil and how to change engine oil. Thank you so much for visiting Craig Kirkman (Owner and Creator of the repair Specialist Channel) Please visit our website: https://www.therepairspecialistonline.com/ Please check out my amazon shop. I have recommended some useful items from Amazon below. I guarantee you that these items are the sorts of things I use on a daily basis so I know they are good. I have to be careful in recommending products because I have my name and credibility at stake. So I will only recommend good products. https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/therepairspecialist #EngineOil #ViscosityExplanation #OilCodesExplained #MultiGradeOil #AutomotiveKnowledge #OilViscosity #CarMaintenance #MechanicalEngineering #EngineOilTypes #HowItWorks #UnderstandingOilCodes #CarEngineCare #DIYAuto #EducationalVideo #AutomotiveEducation #EngineLubrication #OilViscosityChanges #MaintenanceTips #FreeDownload #TheRepairSpecialistOnline
Car Engine - Uses too Much Engine Oil - Why?
18:12
TheRepairSpecialist

Car Engine - Uses too Much Engine Oil - Why?

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED by Craig Kirkman, a renowned you tube educator of these systems. Does your car engine use too much engine oil? This unique video explains why and shows you how good test to find out! For more useful information please take a look at my website: https://www.therepairspecialistonline.com/ Another issue some people have is whether they are actually checking the oil level correctly. Whether cheching randomly or after an oil change. So in response to many questions I have had about this I have made a video, which can be found here in this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-RZXIXME54&t=6s I recommend you look at this video to gather a better understanding of engine oil and its uses. You can find it here in this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmLAS... In case you are wondering what all of those codes on oil bottle mean and why your car uses a particular type of oil then I have this video explaining. In this video, 'engine oil Codes Explained' I basically answer the question: what do oil codes mean? Explained in simple terms, and is one of my popular videos on you tube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hb6CX... My aim is to create more videos on mineral oil, motor oil, best engine oil, how to change engine oil, and how to check engine oil level. Thank you so much for visiting Thank you Craig Kirkman (Owner and Creator of The Repair Specialist Channel) #lawnmower​ #gardening​ #repairing​ #savingmoney​ #chainsaw #Chainsawrepair #oil #smallenginemachines #DIY #howthingswork #lawnmower​ #gardening​ #repairing​ #savingmoney​ #chainsaw #Chainsawrepair #oil #smallenginemachines #DIY #howthingswork Please check out my amazon shop. I have recommended some useful items from Amazon below. I guarantee you that these items are the sorts of things I use on a daily basis so I know they are good. I have to be careful in recommending products because I have my name and credibility at stake. So I will only recommend good products. https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/therepairspecialist
Engine oil 'Explained'  &  Engine Oil Viscosity 'Explained'.
07:32
TheRepairSpecialist

Engine oil 'Explained' & Engine Oil Viscosity 'Explained'.

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED Engine Oil Codes 'Explained' Understanding engine oil codes is essential for choosing the right oil for your vehicle's engine. The codes often appear on oil containers and are designed to provide important information about the oil's characteristics. The most common coding system is represented as something like "5W-30" or "10W-40." Let's break down what these numbers mean: Viscosity Grade: The letter "W" in oil codes stands for "winter." The number preceding the "W" (e.g., 5W or 10W) indicates the oil's cold temperature viscosity, which is its ability to flow at lower temperatures. The lower this number, the better the oil's performance in cold weather. Multigrade Oils: The second part of the code, after the hyphen (e.g., 30 or 40), represents the oil's viscosity at high temperatures. Higher numbers indicate thicker, more viscous oil that is better suited for high-temperature conditions and heavy loads. Lower numbers represent thinner, lighter oils suitable for lower temperatures and fuel efficiency. The SAE Rating: The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) assigns these codes to oils based on their viscosity characteristics. For example, 5W-30 oil has better cold-weather flow properties and high-temperature stability compared to a single-grade oil with a rating of 30. Benefits of Multigrade Oils: Multigrade oils, like 10W-40, are versatile and can adapt to temperature fluctuations. They are ideal for modern engines that experience varying conditions. They provide adequate cold-start protection while maintaining a stable viscosity at high operating temperatures. Engine Oil Viscosity 'Explained' Oil viscosity refers to the thickness or resistance to flow of an engine oil. Understanding oil viscosity is crucial because it impacts an engine's performance and longevity. Viscosity is typically measured at two temperatures, 40°C (104°F) and 100°C (212°F), and is represented as "XW-XX," such as 5W-30 or 10W-40. Here's a detailed explanation: Cold Temperature Viscosity (Before the "W"): The first number (e.g., 5W or 10W) signifies the oil's low-temperature viscosity. Lower numbers mean thinner, more fluid oil that flows better in cold conditions. This is crucial for easy engine starts in colder climates, as it ensures that oil can reach engine components quickly. High-Temperature Viscosity (After the "W"): The second number (e.g., 30 or 40) indicates the oil's high-temperature viscosity. Higher numbers represent thicker oils that maintain their viscosity under high temperatures, making them suitable for hot weather or heavy loads. Shear Stability: A good quality oil maintains its viscosity throughout its life. Oils with good shear stability resist thinning under the mechanical stress of the engine. Thin oil may not provide adequate lubrication, potentially leading to engine damage. Choosing the Right Viscosity: Selecting the right oil viscosity depends on your vehicle's engine, climate, and intended usage. Consult your vehicle's owner's manual for the manufacturer's recommendations. Using the wrong viscosity can lead to insufficient engine protection and poor performance. In summary, understanding engine oil codes and viscosity is essential for selecting the right oil to protect your engine in various conditions. Always follow the manufacturer's recommendations for the best engine oil choice, ensuring proper lubrication and engine longevity. Thank you Craig Kirkman (owner and creator of The Repair Specialist channel) on engine oil #lawnmower​ #gardening​ #repairing​ #savingmoney​ #chainsaw #Chainsawrepair #oil #smallenginemachines #DIY #howthingswork #lawnmower​ #gardening​ #repairing​ #savingmoney​ #chainsaw #Chainsawrepair #oil #smallenginemachines #DIY #howthingswork Please check out my amazon shop. I have recommended some useful items from Amazon below. I guarantee you that these items are the sorts of things I use on a daily basis so I know they are good. I have to be careful in recommending products because I have my name and credibility at stake. So I will only recommend good products. https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/therepairspecialist #EngineOilExplained #ViscosityDemystified #OilCodes #ChooseTheRightOil #EngineMaintenance #VehiclePerformance #AutoCare #OilViscosity #MotorOil #EngineProtection #MaintenanceMatters #AutoMechanics #SaeRating #LubricationBasics #EngineHealth #AutoTips #ViscosityRatings #ColdWeatherOil #HotWeatherLubrication #VehicleCareTips
4-Stroke Oil in 2-Stroke Engine. Can You Do It?  What Happens? 4 stroke vs 2 stroke Oil
13:12
TheRepairSpecialist

4-Stroke Oil in 2-Stroke Engine. Can You Do It? What Happens? 4 stroke vs 2 stroke Oil

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED Mixing 4-stroke oil in a 2-stroke engine can lead to various issues due to differences in their composition and intended usage. Here's an explanation of what happens when you use 4-stroke oil in a 2-stroke engine: Oil Composition: 4-stroke engine oil and 2-stroke engine oil are formulated differently. 4-stroke engine oil typically contains additives and detergents designed for the slower combustion process in 4-stroke engines. 2-stroke oil, on the other hand, is specifically formulated to mix with the fuel and provide lubrication, often at a higher ratio than 4-stroke oil. Lubrication: 2-stroke engines rely on the oil mixed with the fuel to provide lubrication to the engine's moving parts. Using 4-stroke oil may not provide sufficient lubrication for the engine's needs, potentially leading to increased wear and damage to critical components like the piston and cylinder. Carbon Deposits: 4-stroke oil may not burn as cleanly in a 2-stroke engine, leading to the formation of carbon deposits. These deposits can accumulate in the exhaust port and on the piston, affecting engine performance. Incomplete Combustion: 4-stroke oil is not designed to burn completely in a 2-stroke engine. This can result in incomplete combustion, leading to reduced power output, poor throttle response, and increased emissions. Smoke and Fouled Spark Plugs: Using 4-stroke oil in a 2-stroke engine can cause excessive smoke and fouled spark plugs, as the oil doesn't burn efficiently in the combustion process. In summary, while it's possible to use 4-stroke oil in a 2-stroke engine in an emergency situation, it's not recommended for regular use. It can lead to inadequate lubrication, carbon buildup, poor combustion, and other issues that may affect engine performance and longevity. It's best to use the oil recommended by the manufacturer for your specific 2-stroke engine. I'm a big fan of Stihl two stroke oil. I have used it for many years and it has always provided my two stroke engines with super quality lubrication and protection from engine wear, all whilst at the same time allowing great engine running. I have always found this brand to be of fantastic quality at a reasonable price, and have been using this type of oil for many years. Find it here: https://amzn.to/3bGKqTZ Thank you Craig Kirkman (owner and creator of 'The Repair Specialist' channel) on 4 stroke vs 2 stroke #lawnmower​ #gardening​ #repairing​ #savingmoney​ #chainsaw #Chainsawrepair #oil #smallenginemachines #DIY #howthingswork #lawnmower​ #gardening​ #repairing​ #savingmoney​ #chainsaw #Chainsawrepair #oil #smallenginemachines #DIY #howthingswork Please check out my amazon shop. I have recommended some useful items from Amazon below. I guarantee you that these items are the sorts of things I use on a daily basis so I know they are good. I have to be careful in recommending products because I have my name and credibility at stake. So I will only recommend good products. https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/therepairspecialist #2StrokeOil #4StrokeVs2Stroke #EngineOilMix #LawnmowerMaintenance #OilCompatibility #EngineOilExplained #MixingOils #LubricationIssues #CarbonDeposits #EnginePerformance #2StrokeEngine #4StrokeEngine #OilFormulation #FuelMixRatio #EngineCare #OilQuality #InternalEngineDamage #EngineOilDifferences #2StrokeVs4Stroke #MechanicalMaintenance
Engine Oil 'Explained'  -  Oil Viscosity & Multigrade Engine oil  'Explained'
03:37
TheRepairSpecialist

Engine Oil 'Explained' - Oil Viscosity & Multigrade Engine oil 'Explained'

* VISUALLY EXPLAINED Engine oil codes, often referred to as oil viscosity ratings, help users understand the characteristics of engine oils and their suitability for different operating conditions. These codes are typically represented as a combination of letters and numbers, such as 5W-30 or 10W-40. The two most common rating systems for engine oil are the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) viscosity rating and the API (American Petroleum Institute) service classification. Let's break down the differences between these codes: SAE Viscosity Rating: The SAE viscosity rating, such as 5W-30 or 10W-40, is a measure of an oil's viscosity or thickness at different temperatures. The first number (e.g., 5W or 10W) represents the oil's viscosity in cold weather or winter conditions (the "W" stands for winter). Lower numbers indicate lighter, less viscous oils that flow better in cold weather. The second number (e.g., 30 or 40) indicates the oil's viscosity at normal operating temperatures. Higher numbers signify thicker oils that provide better protection at high temperatures. API Service Classification: The API service classification, such as API SN or API CJ-4, is a system established by the American Petroleum Institute to categorize engine oils based on their performance and compatibility with specific engine types. The letter(s) at the beginning of the API classification (e.g., "S" in API SN) signifies the application or service category. For example, "S" stands for gasoline engines, "C" for diesel engines, and "O" for other applications. The second letter in the classification (e.g., "N" in API SN) represents the oil's performance level, with each new letter representing an improved level of protection and engine cleanliness. To summarize, the SAE viscosity rating provides information about an oil's thickness at different temperatures, helping you choose the right oil for the climate you're in. The API service classification, on the other hand, tells you about the oil's performance and its compatibility with different types of engines. Combining both ratings allows you to select the most appropriate engine oil for your vehicle based on factors like climate and engine type. Many thanks indeed Craig Kirkman (Owner and Creator of The Repair Specialist Channel) Castrol MAGNATEC Engine Oil 10W-40 A3/B4, 4L - Green - https://amzn.to/2YPlxiL Please check out my amazon shop. I have recommended some useful items from Amazon below. I guarantee you that these items are the sorts of things I use on a daily basis so I know they are good. I have to be careful in recommending products because I have my name and credibility at stake. So I will only recommend good products. https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/therepairspecialist #EngineOil #MotorOil #OilViscosity #APIRating #SAEViscosity #CarMaintenance #VehicleCare #AutoMechanic #OilChange #AutomotiveTips #Lubrication #EngineProtection #MechanicalMaintenance #APIStandards #OilQuality #EngineHealth #OilChangeTips #AutomotiveEngine #MaintenanceMatters #VehiclePerformance
Engine oil Explained | Multigrade Oil Viscosity Explained | The Basics!